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Teff

Teff is an annual cereal grass whose use can be traced back to around 3359 BC. It’s a staple crop and an important source of nutrition for over two-thirds of Ethiopians, but largely unknown in many Western countries. The grain is found in different colours, ranging from white, dark brown and red, and is a very fine grain – around the size of a poppy seed – so cooks more quickly than other grains. Teff is a hardy crop, able to withstand both waterlogged soils and drought, so is a dependable staple. Its small size makes it almost impossible to process, which means it is almost always found as a whole grain.

Nutrition Information:

  • Gluten free
  • Contains high levels of calcium, phosphorus, iron, copper, aluminium, barium and thiamine
  • Good source of essential fatty acids
  • Good source of phytochemicals such as polyphenols and phytates
  • High in resistant starch, which feed beneficial bacteria in the microbiome

Culinary uses of teff:

  • Mainly used to make injera, a traditional Ethiopian bread. Finely ground grains are slightly fermented, then made into a savoury flat bread, which is described as soft and porous.
  • Can also be used to make porridge and traditional alcoholic beverages

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Stay up to date with the latest in nutrition, plus tips, recipes and a whole lot more.


By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: Grains & Legumes Nutrition Council, Level 1, 40 Mount Street, North Sydney, 2060, http://www.glnc.org.au. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact