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Lupins

Two types of lupin are produced in Australia, the Australian Sweet Lupin (ASL) and the Albus Lupin, popular in the Middle East and Europe. The ASL is a round with a yellow speckled pigment whereas the Albus Lupin is white with a flattened and oval shape. With Western Australia producing approximately 85% of the world’s lupin, this crop was traditionally used for animal feed however has been a human food ingredient in Australia since 1987.

Main culinary uses of Lupins

  • Immature lupin seeds have a similar taste and texture to field peas and can be used as a salad vegetable, in stir fries or for pickling.
  • Lupin flour can easily be used to prepare similar foods to the full wheat foods by substituting 5-20% wheat flour with lupin flour in the recipe.

A table comparing the nutrient content of different types of legumes can be downloaded here.

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By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: Grains & Legumes Nutrition Council, 1 Rivett Road, North Ryde, 2113, https://www.glnc.org.au. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact